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Why I Think ZANU-PF Will Win Elections In 2023: Wellington Muzengeza

The politics in Zimbabwe must be grounded on certain principles universal to every other Zimbabwean regardless of their political affiliation By Wellington Muzengeza In Zimbabwe today, I observe that there is a serious lack of historical and political consciousness amongst both the old and the young, and this needs to be taught to young people and older people alike so that our people truly understand what politics is really about. ZANU PF seems to understand this better than the opposition as they continually invoke memories of the liberation struggle and other related strengths to bolster their support even over 50 years after the organization's formation. Despite the party's many political and economic transgressions after independence, it has clarity on the solidity of its founding principles which resonate with most Zimbabweans as well as the broader Pan-Africanist agenda. I believe that this will again give ZANU PF an urge in the next elections in 2023. The fundamentals of governance in Zimbabwe, must always be driven by citizens and citizen-powered institutions that are homegrown.

The politics in Zimbabwe must be grounded on certain principles universal to every other Zimbabwean regardless of their political affiliation

 

By Wellington Muzengeza

 

In Zimbabwe today, I observe that there is a serious lack of historical and political consciousness amongst both the old and the young, and this needs to be taught to young people and older people alike so that our people truly understand what politics is really about.

ZANU PF seems to understand this better than the opposition as they continually invoke memories of the liberation struggle and other related strengths to bolster their support even over 50 years after the organization’s formation.

Despite the party’s many political and economic transgressions after independence, it has clarity on the solidity of its founding principles which resonate with most Zimbabweans as well as the broader Pan-Africanist agenda. I believe that this will again give ZANU PF an urge in the next elections in 2023.

The fundamentals of governance in Zimbabwe, must always be driven by citizens and citizen-powered institutions that are homegrown. As long as there is any whiff or inkling of external influences as we see with the opposition, they will inevitably give ZANU PF another shot at power in the next elections.

The politics in Zimbabwe must be grounded on certain principles universal to every other Zimbabwean regardless of their political affiliation, colour, race or creed.

It seems that most the main opposition parties in Africa are being funded by Western countries or homegrown African Eurocentric interests.One only has to look at the DA in South Africa, the CCC in Zimbabwe, Bobi Wine in Uganda and many others as examples.

The Europeans have a vested interest to keep African countries divided and fighting each other. It helps maintain their “Europe is a garden that everyone from the jungle wants to be a part of”
belief

When Africans are divided, it is easier for the Westerners and Europeans to protect their interests much better through brainwashed proxies and programmed sycophants.

The neocolonial agenda is not imagined but real. The main opposition in Zimbabwe today as fronted by CCC seems to have predominantly Eurocentric values and western linked funding channels and in my view, does not seem to be grounded in what we want firstly as Africans and most importantly as Zimbabweans, but those of their ‘handlers’ from European and western capitals.

This flaw in the opposition movement’s ideological grounding is what undermines their shot at real political power and gives their opponent a cutting edge election after election.

European interests in Africa, and Zimbabwe in particular – are no longer protected and realised through colonial power but by controlling pliable African political players in opposition movements whose founding is not benchmarked on fundamentals of the anti colonial struggle but western manufactured neo-colonial ‘isms’ like democratic governance, human rights and ‘rule of law’.

These ‘new’ concepts and ‘isms’ as I have observed in the past twenty-two years in Zimbabwe are weaponised to label governments led by liberation-based parties as despotic, tyrannical and human rights violators. However, this, instead of putting opposition movements in good positions to attain power, the effect has been opposite.

Frontrunners and advocates of these ‘ isms’ are obviously carefully selected. The choice of proxies to front these regime change neo-colonial agendas, though opportunistic is brilliant on the part of the western protagonists.

In an African political playing field where former liberation heroes have sadly proven a penchant to turn into villains has given rise to genuine popular opposition movements that at formation sincerely advocate for changes in government as a corrective measure, but eventually get captured by foreign interests because they need funding.

We have an opposition, that naively believes the fantasy of a ‘new world’ where former colonials (who fought a bitter war to preserve Rhodesian hegemony) have suddenly developed a genuine interest in post-independence African domestic affairs.

The opposition in Zimbabwe today embarrasses itself with uncanny associations with organisations bankrolled by the Rhodes Trust which are also steeped in neo-colonialism like Chatham House etc, further hardening the resolve of their ruling party opponents who carefully craft propaganda smear campaigns using this weakness.

This weakness has been at the core of the survival of ZANU PF in its political battles to win the hearts and minds of voters, particularly the rural electorates.

ZANU PF’s biggest attraction to rural electorates will always be it’s land reform programme. It is under ZANU-PF that land reform benefited the average rural electorates from 2000 onwards. I have observed new communities that emanated from that process which are thriving today.

A successful land reform in Zimbabwe is a bad precedent for other African countries as it threatens white monopoly capital interests and this plays down the opposition’s success. Nevertheless mismanagement, corruption, prebendalism and other vices have and continue to happen under ZANU-PF’s watch.

They continue to be the elephant in the room, but I still do not see how the opposition can go past this in 2023 against a powerful organisation like ZANU-PF which has access to seemingly infinite campaign resources and an immature opposition that does not understand the sophistication of its opponent.

In my view, the only way the opposition can attain any form of power in Zimbabwe would be at the prerogative of ZANU-PF through a settlement they will drive in the interest of peace in the country. I am sure that those in ZANU-PF even if they openly drive a hardline stance, are aware of the popularly of the main opposition, which cannot be ignored.

Wellington Muzengeza is the founder and director of the Africa Mindshift Trust. He writes in the Zim Digital Express in his personal capacity.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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